Communion

Draw the Circle Wide

Draw the Circle Wide

You know, I cringe every time Christianity is presented as racist, sexist, anti-Semitic… because at its core, it’s the opposite of all that ugliness. And yes, I am painfully aware that through the centuries the church has been all that and worse. But please don’t think that comes from the Bible, or – worse – from Jesus himself. Don’t ever believe it if someone tells you that’s what it means to be Christian.

Because what Christ envisioned – and what Paul tried to create – was this: that people would come from East and West and from North and South, and sit together at table in the kingdom of God.  

Because that’s how wide the circle is in God’s world. 

Belonging Body & Soul (to Christ)

Belonging Body & Soul (to Christ)

These beliefs aren’t just words; they affect everything about us. If we belong to our Lord Jesus, then we keep nothing hidden from him, or apart from our devotion to him. How we see ourselves, and each other. The way we love, the way we forgive, what we do with our gifts and our power. How we spend our time and how we spend our money. What we value and what we let go. What we long for and what grieves our hearts. 

And the reason we celebrate this sacrament over and over again is that it is so, so hard to remember this truth. It’s hard to hold onto this faith. It’s hard to remember even our deepest, most life-giving beliefs. So we come here to practice, again and again. 

When We Share Bread

When We Share Bread

You know, we’re not all that different from his disciples after that first Easter morning. We’re like the disciples walking along the road, trying to make sense of things that happen in this world, things that don’t make any sense, that make our hearts heavy. Or we’re like the disciples at the lakeshore, back to the daily grind, doing what we’ve always done, wondering why we’re not getting anywhere….

Then Jesus shows up. In the midst of our day-to-day ordinary lives, or our confusion, or our need, he shows up. Oh, we still might not recognize him, still might not get it, still might not understand; I mean, we still don’t expect him, do we? … Until he takes that bread, and lifts it up, and offers it to us again… and we remember what he told us… and our eyes are opened and we know him.